What does Trial Lawyer do?

Trial lawyers represent clients involved in litigation, both civil and criminal. Criminal lawyers may represent plaintiffs or defendants, the people, or the accused. Civil litigators take the side of a party in a dispute where no crime is involved. The trial lawyer’s job is to persuade a jury of the facts in a case, and to display them in a way that best supports their client’s position. Each piece of evidence must be presented and disputed according to a complicated set of rules. On days out of court, trial lawyers review files and scheduling orders, contact witnesses, take depositions, and talk to clients. On court days, lawyers argue motions, meet with judges, prepare scheduling orders, select jurors, and argue cases. The preparation for a trial can take many months. Due to the tremendous cost of litigation, however, most cases settle before they ever reach trial. Trial law requires excellent analytical skills.

A trial lawyer is a person who is education in the law, has passed the bar exam and argues their client’s case in front of a judge or a jury. There are three types of trials in most countries that operate under civil law: criminal, civil and constitutional. A trial is a legal proceeding, where disputes are heard by an impartial person or group of citizen and a binding decision is obtained.